777 Challenge

Since my word-count is usually something more like 666 when I check it, finding a non-demonic number on my Twitter feed was rather refreshing. Author E.G. Moore began the Triple Seven Challenge, and fellow writer Jennifer Todhunter nominated me in turn:

In a rather unfortunate turn of events, page seven of LUCKY THIRTEEN (soon to be retitled, revised, and generally juiced-up) has a mere seven lines on it. I suppose that makes my job easier. Here are those lines:

“But miss,” Number Two said, “how do you know we are from Florence?”

“You’re from Florence. Your friend here,” she said, nodding towards the other man, “is from Siena.”

Danny left them shaking their heads in confoundment. She didn’t get many chances to perform the trick, but when she did, the experience was satisfying. She’d have to tell Giorgio about it later on. He always got a kick out of Danny’s knack for discerning the dialects of his homeland, and he’d know about the famous — or infamous — Gorgia Toscana. The habit of turning a ‘k’ into an ‘h’ marked many a Florentine like the sign of Cain. Giorgio would have a good laugh at tonight’s story.

Okay, okay. It looks like more than seven lines, but you do want the context, don’t you?

And now it’s my turn to nominate seven authors:

Charlotte Gruber (AKA World’s Bestest CP)

Elizabeth Davies (Word-weaving Welshwoman Extraordinaire)

Bud Jillett (Guitar Player and All-around Nice Guy)

Sylvia Heike (Fellow Flash Fiction Freak)

Tegan Wren (Whose awesome novel INCONCEIVABLE is coming soon)

James Stryker (Who I hope will post seven lines from his dark CCBB backstory)

Sharon Bennett (Because she hints she’s got a novel in the works)

That is all.

The Poisoned Point of View

“Limit your POVs to two or three,” they say.

They do say a lot of things, don’t they?

I’m not about to argue with the experts–the writers, agents, editors, publishers, marketers, and creative writing instructors who tell us that eight points of view is Just. Too. Damned. Many. They’ve been in the business longer than I have, and they know things I don’t.

What I can do, though, is offer a counter-example (and a defense, which I’ll get to later). One counter-example. That’s an N of 1, in statistician-speak, and not very telling, but the N in question is a really big book. Here, I’ll give you a hint:

Its title rhymes with The Silence of the Lambs. Read more

Lost (and Found) in Revision Land

Hemingway
Hemingway
Yep.

One month has flown by since my last blog post. Why? Because I’ve been revising LUCKY THIRTEEN.

Tricky business, this. I’ve had to make my bad guy badder, strike out the strychnine (sorry, Agatha), re-plot the plot, and research everything from insulin pumps to St. Catherine to how to write like a staff reporter. And I killed a whole mess of darlings along the way. It’s been simultaneously exciting and exhausting.

My book has changed. Read more

The Birth of a Novel

LUCKY THIRTEEN Banner

LUCKY THIRTEEN BannerI should have titled this “How to Put a Strain on Your Marriage and Drive Yourself Insane in Five Short Weeks”, but that seemed kinda long for a blog post title, so I cribbed from D.W. Griffith’s 1915 cinematic masterpiece and changed the last word.

In previous posts, The Road to Getting an Agent Part 1 and Part 2, I wrote about the querying process.  Since I’ve got some time (I hope) before my agent gets back to me with the red-pencil treatment, I thought I’d jot down a few notes about how LUCKY THIRTEEN — and its protagonist Danny Jones — came to be. Read more